Search

Braking Points

Exploring the Adventure of Aging

Author

ckisler

Western Plains and Mountains Adventure Part One Kentucky to South Dakota

JUNE 2019

Waterfall Yellowstone National Park
IMG_2395

Dear Friends and Family,

Experience tells me that vacations like relationships are not necessarily made in heaven, but Terry and I both agreed that we would do everything possible on our end to make every moment of this trip fulfilling if not restful [it was not restful] for each one of us, Terry, Tom and me. We knew the country we were covering by van would have vistas worth stopping to take in. We also know our vacation may not pique the interest of friends and family. Remember the days of slide show gatherings when someone shared every single slide of their fabulous vacation. Well, I do. Enough said. I have tried to select a few photos as I write this letter that capture some of our travels. But it is a letter and you are free to put it down at any time.

Our western adventure began on June 1, 2019. My plans to have the van fully packed and the crew ready to go by 8 am had to be adjusted due to last minute packing details. How on earth did the early pioneers get their whole household into a covered wagon? I am not naming names but some of us in our little band do not understand the concept of minimalism or even sufficient when it comes to packing for a week. Nor do any of us really believe they have stores in Missouri, Iowa, South Dakota, Wyoming and Nebraska where they sell pretty much the same stuff we can get in Kentucky. Folks we were loaded for bear, well, actually not, since they don’t carry that at the local Big Lots or Rural King. Suffice it to say, the van was full.

IMG_2033The first stop of our trip heading west came in St. Louis. Tom had never been to the Gateway Arch, so we exited I-64—it was the wrong exit, but hey! We still had a visual of the Arch. After traveling many back streets in downtown St. Louis, we arrived and Terry found a great parking space, which was really a surprise.

We walked up to and inside the lower entry hall to the Arch, visited the facilities—something we do at every stop whether we need to or not—after which Tom declined trying out the elevator car they had set up in the lobby. He decided his size and the interior of the elevator were not compatible. We took a few pictures and then with careful attention to our WAZE app managed to get onto I-70 West.

Traveling west on I-70 challenged our defensive driving skills. Obviously, I-70 provides a major route west for trucking, there were a few moments of near freak-out—Me, both when Terry was driving and when I was driving. Then turning north onto I-29 we discovered that much of that interstate was closed due to flooding along the Missouri River and its tributaries. We traveled bunches of back roads both that evening as we approached our first night stop in Council Bluff, Iowa and the next morning as we headed to Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

Our hotel in Council Bluff had a very friendly even funny staff when we checked in late Saturday evening. So, with that in mind I give it ONE star. It had no elevator. They gave us rooms on the second floor. A bunch of college students who were there to party, trust me on that, offered to help Tom and I carry our bags up the stairway. Terry was parking the van.

Pride—ugly beast that it is—got the best of me and I refused. By the time I reached the second-floor landing, I was having visions of toppling over backwards or even more frightening, Tom toppling over backwards hitting me and both of us plummeting to the bottom of the staircase, where Terry would discover us dead in a heap. The rooms were clean enough, but the hallway carpet was filthy, and this is from a not so hot housekeeper’s perspective.

WE Survived. The pioneer spirit in my family died after my great grandparents traveled by covered wagon from Iowa to Southwest Oklahoma to homestead in 1901. The Americinn qualifies as wilderness as far as I am concerned. The pictures of hotels on Expedia do not depict the actual property or they did not in this case.

Reaching Sioux Falls, we intersected with I-90 which took us on our adventure into South Dakota, where among other things we encountered our first real glimpse of miles and miles of Wind Farms. Terry drove while I researched a bit. These babies are huge:

“How big is a wind turbine?
Industrial wind turbines are big

The widely used GE 1.5-megawatt model, for example, consists of 116-ft blades atop a 212-ft tower for a total height of 328 feet. The blades sweep a vertical airspace of just under an acre.”

Our first outing in South Dakota turned up at Mitchell just off I-90. We had decided before we left Kentucky that we would be on the look out for interesting places to explore that were not specifically on our itinerary. The Corn Palace in Mitchell was the first stop like this. It is a monument to CORN, but so much more
Annually, a committee s58118732899__89634366-F7EB-466C-8CD5-7B9044598155
elects a theme and the sides of the palace become murals with using every part of an ear of corn to create the art work. The 2018-2019 theme honors the Armed Service Branches, with some special attention for the two ships christened the USS South Dakota.
So, if you are traveling on I-90 through South Dakota, you might want to take in the Corn Palace in Mitchell.

Our trip took on some extra concerns on our second day. Our son Scott called to let us know that our daughter-in-law Martha had had another and this time more damaging stroke. We stopped where we were and prayed with him, asked him if we should abandon our trip plans and drive to Tulsa, Oklahoma. He said not to do that. They were still waiting to hear back from the neurosurgeon as to a plan of action. So, we continued on, but our hearts were heavier. Terry and I had decided together before we even began our westward journey to pause often, take in the new and wonderful sites we were seeing and no matter what to accept the blessing of being able to travel together. Tom was at times like a kid looking forward to experiencing places he had only seen in pictures.

IMG_2122

By early afternoon Sunday June 2nd we arrived at the turnoff for Badlands National Park. The sun had disappeared so I am unsure how this odd stark country with its myriad of rock layers and colors would have looked in the sunlight. The gathering storms around us created another worldly atmosphere almost like being on another planet—if that planet had earthlings, automobiles, tour buses, scenic turnouts and rattlesnakes, all of which the Badlands boasts.

 

We drove the loop that led us out of the park at Wall, SD where the iconic Wall Drug Store resides. The establishment dates back to the 1930’s when a Nebraska pharmacist and his wife Dorothy purchased it. They were looking for a town with a Catholic Church in which to start a business. Business in Wall with 231 persons in residence was slow at first until Dorothy thought of advertising free ice water to folks traveling through to the brand-new Mt. Rushmore monument some 60 miles away. Parched travelers welcome the rest stop and soon business picked up and. If the crowds we encountered there are any indication, it has not slowed down. Billboards all along I-90 from east to west advertise the store. YeS! They still offer free ice water.

We settled in Rapid City for the night. Word from Our son suggested that surgery the next day would scope the cranial artery that was blocked and put in a stent. Unfortunately, the next day we learned the artery was nearly completely closed and a stent would be impossible. Throughout the remainder of our trip west we were on alert, calling in all the prayers we could for our sweet Martha. And as of today, she has been moved to Rehab in Stillwater, Ok, their home town. Left side remains paralyzed, but she has not had another stroke. So, given all the horrible outcomes we had been given, we are thankful she is still with us and fighting. She also has retained her quick wit and personality.

While in the Rapid City area we visited Mt. Rushmore which truly represents the talents IMG_2148of its designer and the skilled labor that chiseled those distinguished faces into the side of a mountain. When we entered the park, we received a ticket that clearly told us to retain it so we could pay prior to exiting. Terry had the ticket. Climbing the steps to the gates, he remembered he needed another lens for his camera and returned to the car. I never have this problem because I only use my iPhone. We explored the area, took pictures and descended multiple steps to reach the artist’s studio—all of us—Terry, Tom, and I made it to ground level for the monument exhibit. In the process, Tom became turned around a bit and thought we were on the parking lot level rather than 5 floors down. After Tom begrudged me the fact that we were not just a few steps from the parking lot, we consulted a Ranger who offered to let us go get our vehicle and drive it down an access road to pick Tom up.

IMG_2149NOOO! Tom said. So, we started the laborious ascent on uneven rock stairs. Fortunately, about 2 levels up there was a walking trail with a smoother paved although elevated path with rest areas along the way. So, we took the path less traveled by and after some time made the top. Take my word not one of us considered highland hiking as a new hobby.

At the top I asked Terry for the ticket. He looked at me, his face a portrait of confusion. My stomach sank at least two of the levels we had just climbed. “yes, remember I gave it to you when we got out of the van. We pay here to get another ticket to exit.” He lifted one eyebrow, clearly questioning whether I had really given him the ticket or was just joking around. We searched. Alas. After thoroughly exhausting every pigeon hole we could have stuffed a slip of paper into, we agreed. Neither of us had the ticket. A visit to the Visitor’s Center confessing that the ticket that had bold print on it admonishing us to HOLD ON TO THIS TICKET had been lost. She barely made eye contact sending us to the payment kiosk.

At the kiosk I met a charming Japanese young lady with a bright smile, who evidently had heard ‘lost ticket’ many times before, helped us generate a new ticket and pay to exit Mt. Rushmore. I thanked her and then jokingly said, “I bet we are the first people to ever lose their ticket.” Her smile grew even brighter as she affirmed my suspicion that either her English was limited, or we were indeed the very first people to ever lose their parking ticket at Mt. Rushmore on her watch. The voltage of her smile amped up as she vigorously nodded her head and said, “YES! Have good day!”

At the van, Terry leaned over before opening his door and picked up our LOST ticket. He had apparently dropped it when he returned to get his lens.

We ate lunch at Peggy’s in Keystone, SD Where Peggy greeted us and our waiter directed us to Graffiti Mural Alley in Rapid City. Entertaining and the. Food was good.

That afternoon we explored downtown Rapid City and the murals/graffeti

Coming to this portion of the walls gave me pause. I do not know if you can see but faces of survivors are in every square.

And because I am tired, and I bet some of you are too. I am going to leave you with that message HOPE…you can live several days with food and shelter. You can live 4 days without water. You can live a few minutes without air. But you cannot live a single second without hope. No matter how slender the thread is, hold on.

I will write another letter soon with the second half and conclusion of our Western Adventure. I suspect you are all waiting with bated breath.

Grace and Peace,

Carolyn, Terry and Tom

Advertisements

My High School Reunion has Thinned

I wrote this a while back, but with all the graduations around me I felt the urge to share it. To all the grads from kindergarten to Doctorate Live don’t just Exist.

My high school reunion has thinned

There aren’t quite as many as there were back then

My high school reunion has thinned

My high school reunion has thinned

Our paths to this moment littered with sins

My high school reunion has thinned

My classmates have grown quite old

So have I, if I believe what the mirror unfolds

We were young and now we are old

My high school reunion has thinned

We are and we aren’t who we were back then

My high school reunion has thinned

My classmates like I have experienced loss

Parents, spouses, children, health some of the cost

We are who we are because or in spite of this loss

My high school reunion has thinned

Paths diverged have merged, once again friends

My high school reunion has thinned

Our faces hold stories that beg to be told

Our faith has been tested, refined like gold

Memories compiled that long to be told

My high school reunion has thinned

We notice whose missing not like back then

My high school reunion has thinned

We are the survivors, torchbearers of then

Who remember most of it with a grin

My high school reunion has thinned

If you read this and you are still young

Don’t let a song in your heart go unsung

Believe me you won’t always be young.

My high school reunion has thinned.

Organizing the Unmatched Sock Drawer that is My Mind

How can a drawer full of white socks not match? These are questions that often occupy my thoughts in the moments early in my day. It takes a few minutes to pull them together into pairs, choose a pair and put them on my feet.

It is the same scenario with my mind. How can a brain that floods with streams of consciousness be unable to construct one clear sentence? Organizing my thought patterns takes a bit longer than a few minutes in my sock drawer. And that is just so I can put a few sentences on a page, so you can imagine what happens when I need to verbally respond.

Let’s just say, I trip over my own tongue more than I trip over my own feet. This does not happen as often when I am fully engaged in a conversation, going with the flow, responding and listening. No! This tripping usually occurs when I am asked a question that requires forethought.

Truth is, I am a writer not a speaker. I can speak. I have spoken–even at national conventions. I enjoy speaking to audiences. But that type of speaking has already been filtered through and sorted out. I do not do a manuscript because I find my speech patterns hampered by being tethered to podium or script. Nevertheless, mental structuring does happen. I do insert it into a file in my mind.

However, in front of an audience or in casual table conversation, when asked a question that requires a quick construct, I babble a bit–ok, sometimes I babble a lot. Last night I was asked by a friend what I was writing now. Now, I know what I am writing. I know what it is about. But give a synopsis off the cuff. Did not come out clear at all. I wasn’t even sure what I was writing. Old people, chickens, murder–let’s just say my newest attempt at a novel, Fowl Play left a foul taste in my mouth and baffled expressions on my dinner companions. Now I know I need to plan out a synopsis, file it in my brain, in case I am ever asked that question again.

How do you organize your thoughts to write or speak? I always begin with a bottle of water, a cup of coffee, and my quiet time with God. My devotional today explored, believe it or not, James 1:19:

“My dear brothers and sisters, take note of this: Everyone should be quick to listen, slow to speak and slow to become angry,”

‭‭James‬ ‭1:19‬ ‭NIV‬‬

I kid you not. And that verse got me to these few blogging words. How do you organize? I am always looking for new ideas that might help me clear the clutter of unmatched thoughts in my head.

My Laundry Basket and My Brain Overflowth

From Prayer Warriors Thanks to Donna Sidle for Sharing

We just returned from a three day trip to Oklahoma. We experienced the

hospitality of friends–thanks again, Jeanne and Eddie. We celebrated our

granddaughter Gabby’s graduation from high school. We had a much

Needed visit with Terry’s brother and sister-in-law. And we made it back to

Kentucky ahead of the storms.

During that three days we stuffed our dirty clothes into plastic trash bag

Which I have now stuffed into our bathroom hamper–not a pretty sight, it

Kind of looks like it is oozing out over the sides. But, hey! I was one tired

Old hen by the time we got home.

During those three days, our mail stacked up, our routines changed, and our

hearts experienced a deepening of love with all its nuances. From the

celebration of accomplishment and young adults with all their

potential setting out in life to the recognition of how the experiences of life

shape the lives of us on the other side of the mountain of life, we stuffed it all

in.

Our life hamper overflows.

On top of that, we ate differently and we ate more, SO my body overflowth.

As I contemplated how best to reset my physical being, God gave me the

path and outcome for resetting my whole system.

This morning my devotional pointed me to Isaiah 58:6-11

The path:

“Is not this the kind of fasting I have chosen: to loose the chains of injustice and untie the cords of the yoke, to set the oppressed free and break every yoke? Is it not to share your food with the hungry and to provide the poor wanderer with shelter— when you see the naked, to clothe them, and not to turn away from your own flesh and blood?”

‭‭Isaiah‬ ‭58:6-7‬ ‭NIV‬‬

The outcome:

“Then your light will break forth like the dawn, and your healing will quickly appear; then your righteousness will go before you, and the glory of the Lord will be your rear guard. Then you will call, and the Lord will answer; you will cry for help, and he will say: Here am I. “If you do away with the yoke of oppression, with the pointing finger and malicious talk, and if you spend yourselves in behalf of the hungry and satisfy the needs of the oppressed, then your light will rise in the darkness, and your night will become like the noonday. The Lord will guide you always; he will satisfy your needs in a sun-scorched land and will strengthen your frame. You will be like a well-watered garden, like a spring whose waters never fail.”

‭‭Isaiah‬ ‭58:8-11‬ ‭NIV‬‬

And THEN on FACEBOOK my friend Donna shared the image you see with this

post. AMEN

And so these thoughts came:

When life gets out of control

When the hamper of life overflows

When the brain goes chaotic

When the body bulges

When the spirit sags

Get up, Get out, Go, Go, Go

Reach out to friends

But don’t stop there

Orderly life comes one clean sock at a time

Healthy eating requires more than dieting

Abundant life comes

from abundant giving and forgiving.

And

It’s the ones who won’t cross a puddle for you who need it most.

Not an easy path, but the right one.

Mystery Dwells in Every Story

At least that is my experience.  E.L. Doctorow had it right.  The story being told often surprises the author.  You round a curve, headlights on, only to discover a divergent sequence of events unfolding.  I think for me it is God’s way of humbling me.  Oh, you thought, Max was headed to Knoxville.  Where did that log truck come from?  

Writing this I realize that if you’ve met one writer, you have met one writer.  Not all, maybe not any, experience writing a short story or novel, like I do.  Some authors exercise precise control over characters, plot, setting, the whole design set before putting the story into words.

I plan, but I glimpse only a twinkling light at the end of the tunnel.   I plan, but the story finds new characters who deserve attention, perhaps more attention than I care to give them.  I plan but the most joyful experience happens when the words, images, characters carry on as my fingers tap the keys.  With Braking Points daily I printed the new pages and read them to my husband.  Together, he and I, for he is a far better editor than I am, eliminated words, corrected grammar and awkward sentences.  He was and is my greatest encourager.  Watching him react to the plot kept me going for it said at least one person on earth liked the story.  A sprinkle of magic happened in those times. We both became involved with the characters, often discussing them as if they were real.  And therein lies the mystery and the magic of writing fiction.  Truth emerges, even in make believe.  The stories around us fuel the imagination and fire up the engines to create.  So that, what we write like what we read takes us places that are as real as the air we breathe.

Let me encourage you whatever your method of prep and writing to look for the stories, listen to the stories already blooming in your mind, and WRITE them down.  Go with God and discover the mystery that is writing.

 

IMG_6428

Where Stories Dwell

IMG_6426

 

First, Stories Dwell in the Lives of Others

Recently, with the published copy of Braking Points In my hands, I sat down and reread it.  That may seem odd to some, but it refreshed me and it reminded me of the  bits and pieces of others’ lives lived on those pages in the lives of Max and Lily, Amanda, Millie, Sophia.  Why?  Because in listening to the stories of friends and acquaintances over scores of years and sometimes even writing them down, I had a vast treasure trove that I barely tapped writing the novel.  I woke up this morning filled with gratitude for the experiences of others that tap into my imagination and fuel my expression of those in words.  I especially was thinking of my friend Judy, who has a gift for relating every day events in ways that never cease to make me laugh.  In my early morning meandering a story, she told me over lunch last week, brought a smile to my face, then a chuckle and then diabolical as I am I started to think how I could use it in my current novel.

Second, Stories Dwell in the World Around, in the News, in Books

Beyond the political news or maybe sometimes even in the midst of that, there are stories that beg to be told.  Writers tend to be observers.  Not all are introverts who watch, listen, read and turn it all over in their heads.  Some are extroverts who jump into every fray, expounding of every issue, gathering others around them, but it is in their approach to life that stories later to be transferred into words on a page or these days words on a screen are conceived.  There are folks who scour news stories, magazine articles, and travel guides finding kernels of ideas,  ‘what if’s’, that beg to be fleshed out and written.  For me, even a turn of phrase in something I hear or read will set my writer’s wheels turning.  I recently read the following quote in my morning quiet time from a devotion by Christine Caine:

“Our race would be easy if God kept us in the “strength zone” in our lives, but instead, he consistently pushes us into our “weakness zone,” because it is in our weakness that he is made strong” Christine Caine

What caught my attention was her use of the words, “weakness zone,” which started my thoughts rolling around in my head.  With that as a starting point I began to create a story, with setting and two characters to start, a mother and a daughter–always a complex situation.  Later that day, I read on Facebook about what a Rainbow Child was, the child born after a miscarriage, stillbirth or early demise of a sibling.  And I began the construct of a story I wanted to jump into and write.

Third, Stories Dwell in Who I am, in My Faith, My Worldview, My Backstory

I read a lot, both fiction and non-fiction, and usually it doesn’t take me long to get a feel for the author’s worldview.  I learn a great deal that way, even from worldviews widely separate from mine.  I find at the core we are all more alike than different.  I find life stories similar to my own but told from a point 180 degrees out from my own.  I seek to understand others by reading a divergent crop of material.

However, when I write, I cannot adopt another worldview and have words, thoughts, conversations flow onto the page.  I do at times include characters with different worldviews.  My reading and conversations with friends, family, random folk do, I hope, allow me to portray other views truthfully and with empathy of our shared humanity.  Even then my faith in God and Jesus Christ guides me.  Above all else to love.  Want to know what books I discard quickly, books that bleed animosity and hatred onto the page, especially toward people groups.

Stories dwell everywhere.  Stories that long to be told.  In everyone there lies a true story of their life, and in everyone’s story there is also a novel to be written.  I may have started later than others but I long to tell the stories that will capture even a few readers’ hearts.  And I intend to read all the stories others write as well–at least as many as I can.

SMART MOUTHS SMART

“Blessed is the one who does not walk in step with the wicked or stand in the way that sinners take or sit in the company of mockers,”
‭‭Psalm‬ ‭1:1‬ ‭NIV‬‬

Gotta say, Folks, when you slap this verse out there like The Message interpretation does, it loses a bit of its poetic nuance. Unfortunately when I am examining my life I can kinda hide amongst the poetry.

“How well God must like you— you don’t hang out at Sin Saloon, you don’t slink along Dead-End Road, you don’t go to Smart-Mouth College.”
‭‭Psalm‬ ‭1:1‬ ‭MSG‬‬

So here I am on this Saturday morning considering the day ahead. I suspect that I may mosey by Sin Saloon, have to turn around on Dead End Road, but may have some problems staying out of the company of mockers and shooting off my own Smart Mouth.

I don’t know about the rest of you, but I seldom get into trouble keeping my mouth shut. Before a hundred ‘what if’ scenarios pop into your head where keeping quiet might cause disaster, I am referring to conversations–let’s say around a table, with friends. Or discussions in meetings or chats with neighbors about the neighborhood. My smart mouth, which I think of as witty, often come off as sarcastic. Go figure. Or my insight that I loudly proclaim sounds self righteous. Or my interruption to say what I have been harboring in my head shuts others out of the conversation. Or I share information that would best be unsaid.

OR I may spout off in anger crushing someone’s spirit, because of my own smart mouth.

In BRAKING POINTS Max has battled a quick temper since childhood, but his mother taught him a method for handling it. As he adjusts to having a surly teenager along for the ride, his resolve to be reasonable has its limits.
“He had won the battle, but decided it had been at a price. Winning wasn’t all it was cracked up to be. Max had learned that many years before. He recited the Lord’s Prayer silently again before speaking. This time a gentler Max materialized.”

Consider the words and the time it takes to pray them–SO much better than counting to ten.

IMG_6390.JPG
Alaska photo credit Alex Sims

A Journey of 75,000 words begins with a Single Keystroke

imageSomeone asked me if I had a list of characters, backstories, outlines before I began writing BRAKING POINTS.  I did not.  What I had were two elderly characters based in part on my father and mother-in-law, a trunk full of true episodes involving road trips, some mine, some others, including more than one from my in-laws, Maurice and Dorothy.

One story told over and over again happened in the early stages of Dorothy’s Alzheimers.  They were traveling from Oklahoma to Florida where they had a park home in New Port Richey.  Dorothy had curled up in the back seat, which she often did, and fallen asleep.  Maurice stopped for gas in Mississippi, filled the tank, and had gone inside to pay, when Dorothy woke up.  She proceeded into the station to use the facilities.  Somehow he failed to see her.  So climbing back in the car, he glanced in the backseat,  saw her blanket and assumed she was still curled up asleep.  In his defense, Dorothy was a slightly built 4’10” woman who slept all scrunched up.  Off he went.

A hundred miles down the road–how far he actually got is debatable since stories like this one lend themselves to hyperbole–when he stopped so they could eat, he discovered she was missing.  Since this was before cell phones, he laid the pedal to the metal, and headed back to the place he last glimpsed her for sure–asleep in the backseat.  No telling what had gone on back at the station, those details are sketchy, but he found her sitting on a bench out front.

“Dorothy, why did you get out of the car without telling me.”

“I had to pee.”

He apologized to the station attendant who had been keeping an eye on her–they were ready to call the local authorities if he did not return soon.  Thankfully, she was fine.  She looked at the attendant and said, “see I told you, he’d be back.”

Maurice escorted her to the passenger side of the car, got her settled and kept one eye on her the remainder of the drive.

My mother-in-law drifted away from us over the next several years, but Maurice stayed the course.  So when I started Braking Points I found myself on an incredible journey with Max and Lily.  While on that excursion I wrote around 1500 words a day but they were basically unplanned.  In my imagination, I was following along observing and recording it.  Amanda popped up at one of the early stops and later Sophia joined the trip.  Every day I came to the computer excited to find out what happened next? where are we going? who are we going to meet?

A friend and fellow author read the book in its raw form and said ‘you need to follow this one and find Olivia.’

If you want to know who Olivia is, you gotta read BRAKING POINTS.  Just Saying….

 

More from the Free-Range Mimi Chicken: the changes in puberty are a piece of cake compared to the golden-changes


When I was nearing puberty, my mother gave me the “talk”–a fairly disgusting scenario, if I remember it and I DO!  She also gave me a book, ‘So You Are a Young Lady Now’, even though, based on the aforementioned “TALK”, I had decided being a young lady might be the last thing I wanted to be.  Trust me on this, I decided then and there that Peter Pan had the right idea…never grow up.  But as the hormones kicked in, I slowly fell in line with the ‘growing up’ agenda.  

Mid 1950’s

I furthered my education in the classic manner of the time,  discussing IT with my girlfriends.  From the bounty of thirteen/fourteen year old wisdom,  I learned a lot more than that book or my mother told me….although time, life, and experience have proved some of that information to be erroneous if not erogenous.  I figured I had better get in step whether the idea appealled to me or not.
So I checked my chest daily for any evidence of the promised budding bosom.  

At the first sign of any advancement in that area, I coercered my mother into buying my first bras, which I stuffed with bathroom tissue, giving me a rather lumpy set of boobs…and I wager to say NOW, that I was not the only one doing this.  However, in algebra class I sat across the aisle from the female in our 7th grade class who had blossomed early and beautifully.  I matured slower than some…ok, MOST other girls in my class, both physically and socially, shedding bathroom tissue falsies in my wake.


Back then, thirty seemed to be the edge of OLD AGE, while ninety seems more like it now. Even saying that, I realize that I have a friend whose mother is 100, active mentally and physically, still riding her exercise bike 30 minutes a day.  Our exercise class Forever Fit at Fitness Formula boasts a regular participant who is 96 and makes some of us 70 year olds look old.  My husband’s Dad and both his grandmothers lived well into their 90’s and my Mom was 89 when she died. And good grief! Some woman in Germany just gave birth to quadruplets at age 65.


Still at 70, I think a new book should be written…so you writer folks out there get busy…’So Now You Are An Old Lady’,  a book full of fun facts about bones, joints, sagging boobs, no underarm hair (that is a relief), turkey necks. other body changes.  A book that talks about how to deal with embarrassing issues like old age multitasking, laughing, sneezing, farting and peeing all at the same time.  Few sane women past 55 would even consider going ‘commando’, trust me on this. I cannot speak for the gents with regard to going ‘commando’, in fact, I would be interested in hearing how some of them would define the concept.


WHERE is the book that talks about issues like ‘hot flashes’ with remedies short of ripping off every shred of clothing no matter where you are when the heat rises.  A book that acknowledges that OLD People still have a sex life, but doesn’t pretend it can be just like it was when you were kids. . .in all honesty, it can be so much better. I can think of two reasons why from my own experience more romance (him) and fewer hysteromics (me). A book that encourages activities that keep you moving, thinking, praying, laughing and loving.  A book that starts something like, ‘Your body is changing and you are entering the Twilight Zone Golden Years of Life.  Just like in puberty there will be new surprises everyday.  This book’s design focuses on what those changes might be and how to handle them.  Over the years, hopefully, you have been acquiring tools that will assist you in navigating the perils of aging.’


Just like I could not stop the onset of puberty, I cannot stop the aging process.  There is no beauty regime on the planet that will reverse the thinning skin, wrinkles, the effects of gravity on every body part or the atrophy of the brain. . .although I still try.  My life like everyones has been full of ups, downs, joys, sorrows, but thank God for the experiences I have had and the ones I still have before me.



Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑